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07/14/2011

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Great post Laura - and I like the video format. I think you need to copyright "The Transitive Property of Engagement."

Great post Laura - thanks for bringing the Cafe into the multimedia world with this video post!

Your point about disengagement and retention is an excellent one - the danger is not that the employee will leave, but that the employee will stay. When we talk about disengagement, the main focus always seems to be on retention. Passive resistance, information choke points, and stifled creativity can be more detrimental to an organization than turnover. Thanks for highlighting this point that is so often overlooked!

Hi Laura

This is a hugely important issue for today's businesses to get their arms around. My belief is that the level of disengagement in today's workforce is directly related to the survival techniques employed in an attempt to make it through the recession. For example, reduced benefits, frozen salaries, lay offs that lead to everyone else being asked to do more, poor communication, the list goes on. Worst of all is the attitude that many employers have taken that the employees should just be happy to have a job.

They may be happy to have a job, but they're not happy and it's costing the employer dearly. It's time for employers to start addressing these issues. If they don't, the strategies that helped them survive the recession will be their undoing in a healthier economic climate (hint: that's when their best talent will be going elsewhere).

Loyalty down inspires loyalty up. When the organization acts to enhance the individual well-being and career development of the employee, the employee will reciprocate and act in the best interest of the enterprise. The contrary also applies.

Nice change of pace format. And an impressive job of oral presentation, too!

Stephanie, I love how you put this: Passive resistance, information choke points, and stifled creativity can be more detrimental to an organization than turnover. Thanks for commenting!

Kevin I think you're right. The measures of the last couple of years have definitely taken a toll on employee trust and loyalty. And unfortunately, many companies are still behaving that way because they only see the reduced costs on the salary side, not the higher costs on the productivity and morale side. As you pointed out, gratitude for having a job only takes you so far, you may still dislike your job and do the bare minimum to keep it. Thanks for commenting!

Thank you, Jim. My agent's trying to get me a commercial. ;-)

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