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09/15/2011

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If anyone needs a hand with job descriptions there are hundreds of free examples here from which to give you a starting point. www.free-job-descriptions.com also has a search function

Never heard the distinction between strong and weak verbs... so true!

I really like 95% of the content of the article. The one area that I strongly disagree is with any statement of responsibility in the four to eight bullet points that make up the essential job duties. I've always said that I don't care what an employee is responsible for. I am more interested in the WHAT they do. The only place I see a need for a statement of responsibilitiy would in the scope of the job description. I like an independent statement of scope immediately after the job summary. Over the years I've struggle with minimum qualifications as defined by education and experience. I've come to the conclusion that years of experience for any level in a job family should agree with the experience requirements described in job summaries found in salary surveys. Overall, this is a great article. I've also found that managers are much more inclined to cooperate if you can provide them with an initial draft of a job description then have them edit the draft. This is a good article for those who are beginers and for those of us who have written hundreds of job descriptions.

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